Saint John Square


It is one of the foundational center of the City. With a simple glance around the square, we can see the evolution of the type of housing in the old town of Arucas, with buildings built in the 17th, 18th, 19th and 20th centuries.

The St. John Square could be defined as the architectural complex of highest social and historic value in Arucas. Although it is relatively small, it houses a series of domestic and religious buildings dating from the 17th century to more recent times, affording visitors the opportunity to observe the evolution of domestic architecture in the buildings of the old Township of Arucas. At the feet of the principal facade of the Church of St. John the Baptist, its design dates from the 17th century, and it was the centre of the Township of Arucas until the last quarter of the 19th century.


The square has often suffered alterations, since it was originally compacted earth, although a broad quarry slab pavement was built in the centre and from one end to the other in the 19th century. Stone columns, iron railings and steps were installed in 1901. The entire square was covered with slabs and in the early nineteen nineties it was finally paved in the famous blue stone from the local quarries.


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The Plaza de San Juan could be defined as the architectural complex of highest social and historic value in Arucas. Although it is relatively small, it houses a series of domestic and religious buildings dating from the 17th century to more recent times, affording visitors the opportunity to observe the evolution of domestic architecture in the buildings of the old Township of Arucas. At the feet of the principal facade of the Church of St. John the Baptist, its design dates from the 17th century, and it was the centre of the Township of Arucas until the last quarter of the 19th century.

The square has often suffered alterations, since it was originally compacted earth, although a broad quarry slab pavement was built in the centre and from one end to the other in the 19th century. Stone columns, iron railings and steps were installed in 1901. The entire square was covered with slabs and in the early nineteen nineties it was finally paved in the famous blue stone from the local quarries.

The Parochial House (The priest´s House)
The Parochial House (the Priest’s House).

Popularly known as the "Casa del Cura" (Priest’s House), it was built in the 17th century and paid for by the local priest, Juan Mateo de Castro. This is a typical Canary Island home, with characteristic masonry walls, continually whitewashed to disguise their poor quality, and a tiled gable roof. The two floor facade is covered with quarry stone. Another of the features of traditional Canary Island homes are their central inner patios, surrounded by the different rooms, in which there is usually a Dragon tree (Draecena Draco). Doors with black studs, guillotine windows and iron lamps are also characteristic features.

Barbosa´s House
Barbosa´s House

Built towards the end of the 18th century, it is one of the most important houses in the old town centre. It has been dated from the symmetrical design of all its different elements. The windows and doorways are set between two large pilasters. The entire building is made of material from the local Arucas quarries, and there is an outstanding ornate cast iron balcony.

Rafael Ponce de Armas´s House

Rafael Ponce de Armas´s House

Built in the 19th century, it is a two-storey building in which we are able to observe a preference for the symmetrical arrangement of doorways, the use of footing blocks, large windows, side pilasters, an iron balcony and flat roof. Although the exterior follows the classical trends of the time, the traditional inner patio is still present. The use of quarry stone is a constant feature in all the houses in Arucas and this house provides us with an example of an attempt at decoration by alternating the Roman arches of the first floor windows.

Granado Marrero´s House
Granado Marrero´s House

Built in 1907, it stands out because of its size, since it has two floors and five faces, with balconies on the principal facade and the chamfers which form the two front corners. The modernist fashion of the time is evident in the use of flower and plant motifs on the front. The ground floor of the building housed the first Arucas Town Council facilities. The ground floor is currently a shopping area and the first floor is residential.

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